Fears over nuclear-waste trains: Scotland (February 2013)

A meeting will be held at Dingwall next month to gather public views about the journeys, which started in December last year.

The Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) plans to take 44 tonnes of spent fuel from the Caithness site for reprocessing at Sellafield.

For the full story, pick up a copy of today’s Press and Journal or read our digital edition now

By jane candlish

Published: 22/02/2013

MP hopes of better understand feelings toward nuclear waste transportation (November 2012)

2012-11-12 at NOON

By Jeff Labine, tbnewswatch.com

Bruce Hyer has gone on tour to see how people feel about possibly transporting 50,000 tonnes of nuclear waste through their community.

The independent MP for Thunder Bay – Superior North started his tour of northeastern Ontario with a stop in Oshawa on Thursday then moved to Parry Sound. Hyer then continued to Sudbury on Monday where he will hold a town hall meeting.

His final destination will be in Sault Ste Marie on Tuesday.

Hyer picked Parry Sound, Sudbury and Sault Saint Marie because of the potential impact a nuclear disposal site could have on them.

He said the Nuclear Waste Management Organization hasn’t had discussions with communities about a transportation route.

“It doesn’t matter where it is because we’re talking about 600 more trucks a year or 60 trains a year for decades to transport all of these materials and its high level nuclear waste,” Hyer said.

“That’s a lot of waste. Many people are surprised by the amount and the frequency of the trucks.”

The Nuclear Waste Management Organization is looking to finding a suitable spot for a nuclear storage facility. The multibillion-dollar infrastructure project will require a surface area of 250 acres for the buildings and a depth of 500 metres.

Hyer said he’s doing this tour on the transportation route because the NWMO has so far refused to do it.

The organization only held meetings in towns that were interested in being a host community and not in neighbouring communities that would be affected by the route, he said.

“What I am doing is not an adequate substitute by any means for the MWNO doing this in a more complete way,” he said. “I’m getting a sense of the general public’s feelings and what their concerns are and I’m also raising awareness.

“I’m hopeful that what it will do is to broaden the discussion and start a different kind of discussion. You can read a lot of reports but a first hand, live interaction I think is important. I’m listening more than saying. I’m not saying much other than the very basic facts.”

Hyer plans to head back to Thunder Bay once he finishes his town hall meeting in Wawa.

Hyer then plans to hold another town hall meeting in Thunder Bay over the weekend, but likely on a different issue — bringing Via rail back to the North.

That meeting is scheduled for Saturday at the 55 Plus Centre on River Street at 2 p.m.

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North needs say about nuke waste (November 2012)

By Elaine Della-Mattia, Sault Star

Thursday, November 15, 2012 6:38:58 EST AM

Communities need to have more say about the transportation and storage of nuclear waste that could travel through their cities to their final storage place, says Thunder Bay-Superior North MP Bruce Hyer.

Hyer, an independent MP, is touring Northern Ontario and holding town hall meetings in communities likely to be along the transportation corridor for much of Canada’s nuclear waste.

Hyer said there is currently a stockpile of about 50,000 metric tonnes of nuclear waste that needs to be stored in temporary or permanent nuclear waste repositories.

“Canada’s nuclear industry is getting closer to picking a permanent site for that nuclear waste, but regardless of the location that’s chosen, people in a number of communities are likely to see trucks or trains loaded with nuclear waste passing near, or throught their town someday.”

He says those communities on the transportation route – which could include Sault Ste. Marie and the Algoma District with its proximity to the Trans Canada Highway – will bear some risk on any potential nuclear waste spill or accident.

“They should have a say sooner rather than later,” he said.

Almost 20 people attended the Sault Ste. Marie town hall meeting, held Tuesday at Sault College.

Hyer said his tour is designed to educate communities on the issue so that they can be informed and decide as a community what is best for them.

Some of the nuclear waste has a half-life of tens of thousands of years, he said.

Hyer himself said he doesn’t have a personal or professional opinion on the best long-term storage solution for the nuclear waste, but believes that the Nuclear Waste Management Organization needs to better inform communities along the transportation corridor about its plans.

To date, he said, their consultation has focused on the 21 communities which have expressed interest in hosting a long term nuclear waste repository, such as Wawa and Hornpayne.

The Nuclear Waste Management Organization has a step-by-step process on how interested communities apply and get approved to serve as a host for a “deep geological repository,” or underground storage site.

Under the process, the Nuclear Waste Management Organization provides funding for the municipalities to hire consultants to examine and explain the proposal. Open houses are also held to provide information for community members.

Sault Ste. Marie CAO Joe Fratesi said the Nuclear Waste Management Organization has not contacted the city with any information about either nuclear storage or transportation.

Fratesi said he’s not sure how much say a municipality would have if any shipments of the waste travelled along the Trans Canada Highway. That would require government approvals and permits, he said.

Some of the communities that have expressed interest in storing the waste are mining communities that have spent mines that could be used as secure vaults for the waste, Fratesi said.

“I’m not sure we’ve ever been asked and I’m not sure what the community reaction would be,” Fratesi said.

Sault Ste. Marie has been able to diversity its economy over the past two decades and has not had the need to look at nuclear storage, he said.

Experts say that the 10-year project could cost up to $24 billion, provide 800 direct construction jobs as well as numerous other spin offs.

Long-term jobs requiring scientists will be needed to manage the repository once it is operational.

The Nuclear Waste Management Organization is still a long way from building a facility to house the nuclear waste.

It believes it will take another decade to find a successful host community and regulatory approval by various government and ministries will be needed after that.

The Nuclear Waste Management Organization was established in 2002. It was designed to investigate approaches for managing Canada’s used nuclear fuel.

Nuclear power plants operate in Ontario, Quebec and New Brunswick.

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SKB launches new nuclear fuel vessel (October 2012)

 30 Oct 2012

Swedish nuclear fuel and waste management company, SKB, has launched its new vessel, the  “M/S Sigrid”, at Galati shipyard, Romania.

The M/S Sigrid has been designed and built by Dutch owned Damen Shipyards which owns the Galati shipyard, for the transportation of nuclear fuel and radioactive waste from SKB’s nuclear power facilities in Oskarshamn and Forsmark.

The new vessel is somewhat larger than its predecessor, M/S Sigyn, measuring LOA 99.5m, with a top speed of 12 knots, allowing it to transport up to 12 nuclear waste containers and 20% more cargo than its predecessor.

Bo Sundman, director of operations, SKB, said: “The launch marks an important milestone in the project. 20 months ago, this vessel was nothing more than a drawing. Now she is a reality. The vessel is the result of hard work and good project management.”

SKB’s newest vessel includes a double hull, radiation protection, four engines and other multiple systems and is designed to operate more efficiently.


The M/S Sigrid is expected to arrive at the Port of Oskarshamn in summer 2013.

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