Posts Tagged NWMO

City of Elliot Lake Moves to Step 3 (December 2012)

On December 10, 2012, the City of Elliot Lake passed a resolution to move to Step 3 of the Nuclear Waste Management Organization’s siting process.

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Town of Spanish Moves to Step 3 (December 2012)

On November December 5th, the Town of Spanish passed a resolution to move to Step 3 of the Nuclear Waste Management Organization’s siting process.

Minutes of Regular Meeting 

December 5, 2012

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Town of Blind River Moves to Step 3 (December 2012)

On December 3, 2012 the Town of  Blind River passed a resolution to move to Step 3 of the Nuclear Waste Management Organization’s siting process.

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Township of the North Shore “resolves” to “invite” Serpent River First Nation in NWMO project (December 2012)

In its meeting of  December 12th, 2012 the Township of the North Shore “RESOLVED THAT Council invite the Township’s immediate neighbouring community of the  Serpent River First Nation to engage in a conversation regarding the Nuclear Waste Management Organization project. “

Minutes of Regular Meeting 
December 12, 2012 

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Township of the North Shore Moves to Step 3 (November 2012)

On November 28th, the Township of the North Shore passed a resolution to move to Step 3 of the Nuclear Waste Management Organization’s siting process.

Minutes of Regular Meeting 

November 28, 2012

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Nuclear waste meetings move to Prince Albert (February 2013)

The debate over whether Saskatchewan should store nuclear waste moves to Prince Albert on Friday.

Saskatchewan is a world leader in the production of uranium, but doesn’t have any nuclear power plants or store nuclear waste.

However, the industry is looking for a region to store power plant waste deep underground and some communities in the province have expressed some interest.

CBC News – Posted: Feb 22, 2013 11:12 AM CST

 The Federation of Saskatchewan Indian Nation has been given $1 million by the Nuclear Waste Management Organization to hold a series of sessions about the concept in order to gauge First Nations interest. On Thursday, Saskatoon was the venue.

The meetings were criticized by Owen Swiderski, deputy leader of the Saskatchewan Green Party, who says the FSIN appears to be one side of the issue.

“Honestly, to me it seems like they’re promoting a nuclear waste dump in Saskatchewan,” he said. “They’re saying the money will help them, but the money and jobs is not worth the destruction to the environment.”

Protesters are expected at today’s meeting in Prince Albert.

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Long-term nuclear waste repository ‘not worth it’: FSIN vice chief (February 2013)

Aboriginal leaders and community members met with representatives from the Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) for a session Friday at the Prince Albert Inn to learn more about a plan to potentially store nuclear waste in northern Saskatchewan.

Published on February 22, 2013 – Prince Albert Herald

Sessions were held in Saskatoon and Regina earlier this week to discuss the same topic. The NWMO provided the FSIN with $1 million over three years to fund the nuclear waste sessions.

While Friday’s session was open to First Nations people but closed to the media, participants spoke with the Daily Herald during a break in the day’s agenda.

Bobby Cameron, vice chief of the Federation of Saskatchewan Indian Nations (FSIN), said the purpose of the meetings has always been the same.

“That’s to inform and educate our First Nations people on nuclear waste management, the storage and transportation,” he said. “We have nothing to hide. We invite our First Nation folks to come out and raise their concerns.”

Twenty-one communities in Saskatchewan and Ontario have expressed interest in accepting the NWMO’s plan to build a nuclear waste repository, with those in Saskatchewan currently in the first phase of step three — an 18-month to two-year process.

Cameron clarified that there are far more communities in Ontario that are interested, with only three out of the 21 being in Saskatchewan.

“As I said in my opening comments this morning, there are far more communities interested in Ontario than there are in Saskatchewan. It’s not set in stone that waste is going to be stored here in Saskatchewan,” Cameron added.

The NWMO is in the midst of searching for a site to store millions of used nuclear fuel bundles, which are currently being stored on an interim basis at various facilities around the country.

While Pinehouse, Creighton and English River First Nation are being considered, there has been opposition shown toward the proposal by residents of those communities.

Citing environmental concerns, Cameron said he is aware of the opposition that exists.

“To tell you the truth, I represent 74 communities, and the consistent message out there is the majority of them don’t agree with nuclear waste management and the safety of it — and I speak on behalf of them,” he said.

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