AECL Public Meeting – May 10 2018

Northwatch has received notice that o

n May 10 2018, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) will hold a public meeting. The forum will provide an opportunity to learn about the company’s governance model – the Government-owned, Contractor-operated model – as well as its plans for the future. According to the notice, Claude Lajeunesse, Chair of the AECL Board of Directors, and Richard Sexton, President and CEO, will present at this meeting and will be available to answer questions from the public.

The meeting will take place in Pinawa, Manitoba on May 10, 2018 from 18:00 – 19:30 central daylight savings time; 19:00 – 20:30 eastern daylight savings time and will be webcasted live on AECL’s website (www.aecl.ca).

Members of the public who will be joining the meeting via webcasting are invited to provide questions in advance of the meeting via email at communications. This mailbox will also be monitored for any questions received during the meeting. Best efforts will be made to answer questions received via email during the meeting within the allocated time; unanswered questions will be addressed in writing directly to requestors.

For more information, please contact: communications

1-888-220-2465

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Laurentian University Teams Up with Nuclear Industry in push to bring nuclear power to remote northern communities

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23 February, 2018 21:10

The 2018 “Nuclear Waste Online” webinar series has been launched. The first session will be at noon on February 28th, and will be an update and overview of the nuclear industry’s efforts to find a burial site for all of Canada’s high level nuclear fuel waste. Click on the link for details, including how to register. https://mailchi.mp/740a4a3b4ce8/cfx8ccozgv

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NWMO report explains Elliot Lake’s removal from nuclear repository plan

NWMO Presents Mayor Dan Marchisella with a plaque thanking the community for its participation in the selection

Elliot Lake | NWMO’s vice president of Indigenous Relations Bob Watts presented Mayor Dan Marchisella with a plaque thanking the community for its work during the site selection process to find a location for a nuclear waste repository facility.

NWMO’s vice president of Indigenous Relations Bob Watts presented Mayor Dan Marchisella with a plaque thanking the community for its work during the site selection process to find a location for a nuclear waste repository facility.

NWMO’s vice president of Indigenous Relations Bob Watts presented Mayor Dan Marchisella with a plaque thanking the community for its work during the site selection process to find a location for a nuclear waste repository facility.

NWMO’s vice president of Indigenous Relations Bob Watts presented Mayor Dan Marchisella with a plaque thanking the community for its work during the site selection process to find a location for a nuclear waste repository facility.

Elliot Lake council was given the reasons why the community was dropped as part of an extensive search for a potential site for the location of an underground repository for waste generated by Canada’s nuclear plants.

The city was informed in December that the Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) had dropped the community in its consideration of a possible site, located north of Massey, as a potential location. Three sites were considered and would have required partnerships of several municipalities along the north shore, including Blind River and Serpent River as part of the process of developing a site for underground storage of nuclear waste.

NWMO’s vice president of Indigenous Relations Bob Watts presented council’s committee of the whole with a report on the organization’s findings and conclusions. Councillors Connie Nykyforak and Lou Cyr were absent from Monday evening’s meeting.

The NWMO hosted several public meetings since the site selection process was started in the Elliot Lake area in 2012 and worked closely with a local liaison committee in a bid to find a “suitable site.”

“It‘s been a lot of studies done, a lot of work done,” he said of several studies done, including geological mapping to determine suitability of the rock formations where the underground facility could be located, long-term stability of a potential site, safety, access based on terrain. Repository construction, operation and closure, and partnerships with municipalities within the potential site location.

The report found, “complexities associated with the geology, limited access and rugged terrain,” as some of the factors that led to the organization’s decision to drop the area as a potential site.

As part of its mandate, the organization also looked at partnerships between municipalities, First Nations and Metis communities as part of the development and operation of a nuclear waste facility.

“Social studies and engagement with people in the area identified low potential to develop the breadth of partnerships need to implement the project,” the report stated.

“The decision was taking into account all of these findings both from social and technical studies,” Watts said. “The decision was made to conclude the study.”

Kris Svela for ElliotLakeToday, as posted 5 February 2018, at https://www.elliotlaketoday.com/local-news/nwmo-report-explains-elliot-lakes-removal-from-nuclear-repository-plan-831882

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The Swedish Environmental Court’s NO to the final repository for spent nuclear fuel – a triumph for the en vironmental movement and the science

23 January 2018 | The Swedish Environmental Court says no to the power industry’s Nuclear Waste Company SKB’s license application for a final repository for spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark, Sweden. This is a huge triumph for safety and environment – and for the Swedish NGO Office for Nuclear Waste Review (MKG), the Swedish Society for Nature Conservation (SSNC), and critical scientists who have been presenting risks of the malfunction of the selected method. Now it is up to the Swedish government to make the final decision.

– We are relieved and very happy about the Environmental Court’s statement, says Johanna Sandahl, President at the SSNC.

– The fact that the Court rejects the power industry’s Nuclear Waste Company SKB’s applied solution means of course that the problem of how to finally dispose the spent nuclear fuel from the Swedish nuclear power plants remains. Though, this shows the strengths in a functioning environmental proceeding, in which safety issues and good documentation are required.

The statement concerns Sweden’s most important environmental case of all times. The Environmental Court has been taken into consideration viewpoints from all parties of the case, including the scientists who have raised their concerns about disposing the spent nuclear fuel in copper canisters. During the legal proceedings, the Swedish NGO Office for Nuclear Waste Review (MKG) and the Swedish Society for Nature Conservation (SSNC) have presented the shortcomings of the applied method. For many years, the environmental organisations have been arguing that the Nuclear Waste Company SKB need to listen to critical scientists as well, and investigate alternative disposal methods, especially the possibility to develop a disposal method of very deep boreholes.

– This is a triumph for us. From now on, the work on evaluating safer disposal solutions will continue. The decision that will be made concerns waste that will be hazardous for thousands of years. Several independent researchers have criticized both the applied method and the selected site. There is a solid documentation as base for the Environmental Court’s decision. It is hard to believe the Swedish Government’s conclusions will be any different from that of the Court’s, says Johan Swahn, Director at MKG.

In parallel with the Swedish Environmental Court proceedings, the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (SSM) has been evaluating the application in accordance with the Act on Nuclear Activities. This morning, the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority announced their statement to the Swedish Government. They approved the license application based on the assumption that the industry has “potential to achieve” the safety requirements. The Authority decision is based the continual step-by-step assessment in accordance with the Act on Nuclear Activities.

– We expect the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority to continue the evaluation on the controversial issue of copper corrosion, in order to make sure the Swedish Government are provided with the best possible documentation when they are making the final decision, says Johanna Sandahl.

MKG and SSNC will continue to follow up the research in this field, as well as the Court’s argumentation and Swedish Radiation Safety Authority’s work.

Links:

Summary of the Court’s statement, 180123 >> (in Swedish)

The Environmental Court’s statement to the government, 180123 >>(in Swedish)

As posted 23 J anuary 2017 at http://www.mkg.se/en/the-swedish-environmental-court-s-no-to-the-final-repository-for-spent-nuclear-fuel-a-triumph-for-th

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Final disposal in Forsmark: The court requires more evidence

Now the Land and Environmental Court has made its opinion to the government regarding the final disposal method of nuclear waste in Forsmark: “There is still uncertainty about the ability of the canister to contain the nuclear waste in the long term.”

Forsmark – On Tuesday, two important opinions came about Swedish Nuclear Fuel Management AB’s application for a license for nuclear waste disposal. The Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (SMM) recommends that the government give permission for a final nuclear fuel spent in Forsmark and an incineration plant in Oskarshamn.

“SSM’s message shows that our final disposal concept, which we researched and developed for almost 40 years, is capable of meeting the very high standards of radiation safety,” commented SKB CEO Eva Halldén after the announcement.

Later on Tuesday , the Land and Environmental Court’s opinion also came to the government, which then made the decisive decision. Judgment of the Court: Additional information about the capsule is necessary in order for the final repository to be allowed.

“The uncertainties are about the extent to which the capsules can be damaged by corrosion and processes that affect the mechanical strength of the capsule. The overall investigation shows that the uncertainty about the capsule’s protective ability is significant and that all uncertainties have not been taken into account in SKB’s safety analysis. current safety analysis reveals that the final repository is safe in the long run, “says the opinion.

The conclusion is that the final repository can be permitted under the Environmental Code only if SKB reports additional documentation that clarifies that the repository is safe even with regard to the capability of the capsule, the court will inform.

Regarding SKB’s application for permission to operate at the existing Clab plant and the planned Clink enclosure in Oskarshamn, the court is of the opinion that operations may be permitted under the Environmental Code.

As posted 23 January 2018 at http://www.norrteljetidning.se/uppsala-lan/osthammar-kommun/slutforvar-i-forsmark-domstolen-kraver-mer-underlag

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No to the final disposal of nuclear waste – uncertainty about safety

January 23 – Sweden – Today, the Market and Environmental Court (MMD) submitted its opinion to the government, which will make the decisive decision, concerning the final disposal method with copper capsules. The court is of the opinion that further information is needed on the capsule – in order for the final repository to be fully permitted. There is an imminent uncertainty surrounding the sustainability of the capsules.

Today the message came: The Land and Environmental Court (MMD) estimates that more documentation is needed before they can allow the method in the application for final disposal in copper capsules such as Swedish nuclear fuel management (SKB).

“SKB’s investigation is solid, but there is still uncertainty about the ability of the capsule to contain the nuclear waste in the long run ” , it is possible to read the opinion.

Uncertainty about security
The question that MMD has looked into is whether the method proposed by the Swedish Nuclear Fuel Management (SKB) meets the requirements of the Environmental Code and, ultimately, follows the law. The waste should be stored in copper capsules embedded in clay 500 meters down the urber at Forsmark’s nuclear power plant – for many years to come.

The cracking question has been: keeps the capsules?

“The conclusion is that the final repository can be permitted under the Environmental Code only if SKB reports additional documentation that clarifies that the repository is safe even with regard to the capability of the capsule ” , they write further.

Yes to location – but no to method
The right, on the other hand, says yes to the location of any final disposal facilities: in Forsmark and Oskarshamn.

“However, the operation poses a risk of significant damage to the Forsmark-Kallrigafjärden regional interest area, but the Land and Environmental Court believes that the national interest for final disposal should be given priority . Authorization is required for several Natura 2000 areas. If safeguards are taken, permission can be granted for Natura 2000 areas, ” writes the right.

But in the end, the court asks for more information about whether the capsules are actually safe. Hence, they say no to the method.

“Based on the current security analysis , the court can not find that the final repository is safe in the long run, ” they comment.

Government decision
On Tuesday, however, the regulatory authority gave the Radiation Safety Authority ok to the method – after a five-year review. SSM believes that SKB has succeeded in showing that it is possible to meet all requirements for a radiation-safe final disposal.

The instances have, simply explained the test, the method based on different laws. Today’s opinion of the court’s weight is heavy.

Negotiations took place all autumn in the Land and Environmental Court of the Nacka District Court. The decision of the Environmental Court is one of five that must be passed before all is clear.

The government ultimately has the final word.

As posted 23 January 2018 at https://www.svt.se/nyheter/lokalt/uppsala/idag-avgorande-beslut-om-slutforvar-i-forsmark

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